Symbolic image of light interacting with a gold surface with 4-fold symmetric Archimedean spirals: Plasmons with orbital angular momentum are excited and swirl towards the center.

March 17, 2017

Publication in SCIENCE: Revealing the subfemtosecond dynamics of orbital angular momentum in nanoplasmonic vortices

Our new Science article 'Revealing the subfemtosecond dynamics of orbital angular momentum in nanoplasmonic vortices' by Grisha Spektor, Deirdre Kilbane, Anna-Katharina Mahro, Bettina Frank, Simon Ristok, Lior Gal, Philip Kahl, Daniel Podbiel, Stefan Mathias, Harald Giessen, Frank-Joachim Meyer zu Heringdorf, Meir Orenstein, and Martin Aeschlimann has now been published.
[Picture: University of Stuttgart, Image by Sven Hein.]

Press articles:
Symbolic image of the time-resolved dynamics of plasmons with orbital angular momentum: The interaction of light is indicated, and the individual snapshots at different times indicate the plasmons with orbital angular momentum. The 4-fold vortex in the center is swirling around. The black and white images are actual data from the electron imaging experiments.  University of Stuttgart, Image by Florian Sterl and Nikolai Strohfeldt.
Symbolic image of the time-resolved dynamics of plasmons with orbital angular momentum: The interaction of light is indicated, and the individual snapshots at different times indicate the plasmons with orbital angular momentum. The 4-fold vortex in the center is swirling around. The black and white images are actual data from the electron imaging experiments.
[Picture: University of Stuttgart, Image by Florian Sterl and Nikolai Strohfeldt.]
Experimental setup: a femtosecond laser pulse impinges onto a single crystalline, atomically flat gold sample, where a nanostructure has been cut into by ion-beam milling. Plasmons are excited. At high plasmon intensities, electrons are liberated, which are then imaged in an electron microscope. By sending in two laser pulses with a certain time delay and recording the electron microscopy images, entire movies can be composed of those snapshots, revealing the femtosecond dynamics of the plasmons with orbital angular momentum. University of Duisburg-Essen.
Experimental setup: a femtosecond laser pulse impinges onto a single crystalline, atomically flat gold sample, where a nanostructure has been cut into by ion-beam milling. Plasmons are excited. At high plasmon intensities, electrons are liberated, which are then imaged in an electron microscope. By sending in two laser pulses with a certain time delay and recording the electron microscopy images, entire movies can be composed of those snapshots, revealing the femtosecond dynamics of the plasmons with orbital angular momentum.
[Picture: University of Duisburg-Essen.]
Electron microscopy images of long-range surface plasmons in a sample with orbital angular momentum of l=10. Upper row: Experiments. Bottom row: Simulations.  University of Kaiserslautern and Technion, Haifa, Experimental image taken by Deirdre Kilbane. Theoretical simulation by Grisha Spektor.
Electron microscopy images of long-range surface plasmons in a sample with orbital angular momentum of l=10. Upper row: Experiments. Bottom row: Simulations.
[Picture: University of Kaiserslautern and Technion, Haifa, Experimental image taken by Deirdre Kilbane. Theoretical simulation by Grisha Spektor.]
Experimental electron microscopy images of short-range surface plasmons with orbital angular momentum l=4.  University of Duisburg-Essen, Image taken by Frank Meyer zu Heringdorf, Philip Kahl, and Daniel Podbiel.
Experimental electron microscopy images of short-range surface plasmons with orbital angular momentum l=4.
[Picture: University of Duisburg-Essen, Image taken by Frank Meyer zu Heringdorf, Philip Kahl, and Daniel Podbiel.]
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